Category: Queens LP

Posts for Queens County, NY

April 28, 2020: First-Ever Libertarian Party presidential primary in New York State

April 28, 2020: First-Ever Libertarian Party presidential primary in New York State

Everyone who wants to participate in the 2020 Libertarian primary election process will need to be enrolled Libertarian. Help make more history. Get your friends and family to change their party to Libertarian: https://voterreg.dmv.ny.gov/MotorVoter/

Everyone enrolled in ANY party can vote for Libertarian candidates in the 2020 GENERAL election.

Take Action Today To Protect Your Voter Options in NY

Take Action Today To Protect Your Voter Options in NY

BLATANT DISRESPECT FOR YOU

The Libertarian Party jumped the hurdles that the Democratic and Republican Parties created for competing parties to gain ballot access in NY. We worked hard in 2018 to have the Libertarian party listed on the ballot and on voter registration forms. Now that we’re growing rapidly, with historic candidate wins on the Libertarian line in 2019 and rapid growth in voters choosing the Libertarian Party on their voter registration forms, the Democratic and Republican parties are trying to rig the rules to stop us.

With blatant disrespect for you and all voters, Albany legislators created the Public Campaign Finance Commission, appointed their friends as the commissioners, and gave them authority to change election laws. This Public Campaign Finance Commission voted to make the qualification process for ballot access up to 3 times harder under the guise of setting up a campaign public financing program. The Commissioner Jay Jacobs has a significant conflict of interest in setting up these more challenging rules for smaller parties.  Jacobs was appointed by Governor Andrew Cuomo, is coincidentally the head of the state’s Democratic Party, and served as de facto chair. Unless the Albany legislature acts to intervene now, the Commission’s votes will become law for 2020.  
Albany’s Democratic and Republican representatives want to eliminate all competing political parties by making it 3 times harder for smaller parties to get on a ballot access and to maintain that ballot access over time…and then they want to funnel $100 million per year of your hard-earned tax money into campaigns of their own candidates.  Do not let them eliminate your voting options.

TAKE ACTION NOW TO ENSURE YOU HAVE ELECTION CHOICES IN THE FUTURE

As soon as you can TODAY, go to LPNY.org/FairVote and do the following:
  1. Call or email your representatives in the NY Assembly AND the NY Senate. We will help you look up their phone numbers or emails and help you with what to say.
  2. Fill out the web form to tell us how you did.
  3. Spread the word. Only your voices can stop this. With all of us working together, we hope to prevent these election changes from going into effect in 2020.
  4. Donate to the Libertarian Party of New York so we can combat this absurd legislation, including preparation for a potential costly legal challenge.
  5. There is strength in numbers. Get more friends and family to change their party to Libertarian on the NY Voter Registration form – this is one of the things we fought so hard for.  It takes 2 minutes to change your party online.  Be sure the NY Board of Elections has you coded properly. We hear every day from voters whose party is still not properly listed as Libertarian. Check your party online now.
Tell your friends, coworkers, and family members that if they have EVER wanted more parties and perspectives to choose from on Election Day (and millions of voters do), then they need to speak up NOW.  Share the FairVote page. Regardless of their political party, ask them to act today.

 


OUR MOMENTUM WILL NOT BE STOPPED

Cuomo and his Democratic and Republican cronies on this Commission don’t know who they are messing with. They are not counting on you and tens of thousands of Libertarians and allies standing up for this party we have fought so hard to build.  If you value your personal freedom, if you value honest competition and innovative ideas for government, if you want to stop this blatant attempt to squash competition, then make the time to take action today. Our momentum will not be stopped.

No matter what political party you align with, thank you for helping to protect choices and fresh ideas in elections.

Protect Our Ballot Access

Protect Our Ballot Access

taken from https://lpny.org/fairvote/

STEP 1: CONTACT INFO FOR YOUR REPS IN NY ASSEMBLY and NY SENATE

Call or email them both with this information:

I am a voter in your district and I do not support the Campaign Finance Commission’s efforts to destroy the Libertarian Party and other parties in New York that aren’t Democratic and Republican. I am enrolled in the (INSERT YOUR PARTY HERE) party. The Democratic and Republican Parties are in control of every aspect of the rules for their political competitors and cheating those other party competitors is unacceptable. I deserve to have choices and I want to be able to tell my friends and family that my representative didn’t try to stay in power by cheating your smaller competitors.

Sincerely,

(Your full name)
(Your mailing address)
(Your email)
(Your phone number)

STEP 2: TELL US HOW YOU DID

 Go here

STEP 3: SPREAD THE WORD

Share the link to this page with everyone you know and ask them to take the same steps. It doesn’t matter what your current party is. Millions of voters say that a strong third party is vital. Please help make sure that New York doesn’t lead the country in restricting the rights of voters to have those options.

STEP 4: DONATE TO HELP US STOP THIS WAR ON YOUR CHOICES

Donate to the Libertarian Party of New York today so we can be ready quickly for potential costly legal battles.

  • PayPal
  • Or send a check made out to “Libertarian Party of New York” to:

Libertarian Party of New York
PO Box 1627
Batavia NY 14021

The Libertarian candidate for Public Advocate, Devin Balkind, supports policies that sound like ones a progressive Democrat supports. So what’s the difference?

The Libertarian candidate for Public Advocate, Devin Balkind, supports policies that sound like ones a progressive Democrat supports. So what’s the difference?

5 Solutions the Public Advocate Should Deliver for New York City

5 Solutions the Public Advocate Should Deliver for New York City

Edwin J. Torres/Mayor's Office

by Devin Balkind

This post and image originally appeared July 23rd on Gotham Gazette.

The New York City Public Advocate is a poorly defined position that, over its 30 years of existence, has often been used to advance the political interests and status of career politicians. I’m running for Public Advocate because I want to do something very different with the office: turn it into a “startup” working in the public interest to deliver real products and services that improve New Yorkers’ lives and helps under-resourced civil servants modernize our city’s government.

I’ll do this by delivering five noncontroversial “solutions” that I’ve outlined in Gotham Gazette columns over the last few years: 1) strengthening our social safety net; 2) kickstarting technology-enabled government reform; 3) improving civic engagement processes; 4) facilitating metro-regional coordination; and 5) producting websites that help New Yorkers see and understand their government.

1) A Searchable Safety Net
Politicians talk constantly about our city’s safety net, but where is it? New York City doesn’t have what almost every major city in the country does — a “211” system that organizes government and nonprofit health, human, and social service information and makes it available to the public through a website and 2-1-1 phone hotline.

Everyday thousands of city and nonprofit staff are duplicating work and struggling to keep their own resource directories up-to-date, recognizing that the availability of this information is the difference between a New Yorker accessing the critical health and social services they need or needlessly suffering without it.

No nonprofit or government agency has taken it upon themselves to solve this citywide problem — but the Public Advocate can and should.

As Public Advocate, I will create an open source directory of all available health, human, and social services available in New York City, and make that information accessible on the web, via an app, by phone, and via API to partner organizations all over the city.

2)  Digital Transformation Team
New York City’s bureaucracies were designed in an era of telegrams, switchboards, and printed memos. It’s past time for an upgrade. And the best way to get one is by helping city agencies create their own Digital Service Organizations (DSOs). These groups use open source technology and agile production techniques to bring government services and the bureaucracies that provide them into the modern era.

The first DSO was the UK’s Government Digital Service. Founded in 2011, it has driven a digital transformation in the UK government — greatly improving services and reducing annual operations’ costs by over a billion pounds per year. We could get similar results in New York City, but someone needs to lead. That someone should be the Public Advocate.

As Public Advocate, I will work to ensure that New Yorkers get faster, better, and cheaper government services by working with civil servants and their agencies to train, support, and network them together as we create DSOs throughout our city’s various government agencies.

3) Civic Engagement Oversight
In November 2018 New Yorkers voted overwhelmingly to establish a “Civic Engagement Commission” (CEC) to “enhance civic participation.” We need to make sure that the CEC advances the interests of the public, rather than those of politicians.

As the voice of New Yorkers, the Public Advocate is in the perfect position to provide oversight and help improve New York City government’s civic participation programs. We can do this by providing New Yorkers with clear information about the city’s existing public participation processes, which agencies are doing them, who leads them, what metrics they use to determine success, and how those programs could be improved using best practices (which I’ve honed over the past decade from working around the world).

Then, we will establish an “Engagement Lab” that works with individual civil servants and government agencies to support them as they establish and improve public engagement processes.

4) A Regional Organizing Project
New York City is the largest city in the United States with more than 8.5 million residents, but we’re also the beating heart of the nation’s largest “metropolitan area,” with a population of over 23 million spanning four states and 30 counties.

Our city’s ability to tackle some of our most important challenges such as housing, transit, energy, pollution, climate resilience, and more all require regional solutions. But systemic coordination among the 30 counties and four states in the New York Metropolitan Area doesn’t happen efficiently. In fact, it’s hardly happening at all. Our current methods for regional coordination are woefully inadequate, relying on a hodgepodge of nonprofits, commissions, and multi-government “authorities” that each work on their own sliver of these massive and deeply interconnected challenges.

Sometimes these groups compete; sometimes massive areas of work go completely uncoordinated; and the public is hardly aware these groups exist or that they are charged with making such important decisions. Unfortunately, we experience this coordination failure everyday — crumbling subway systems; out-of-control infrastructure construction costs; our communities’ unmitigated vulnerability to extreme weather are all evidence of this massive problem.

That’s why, as Public Advocate, I’ll launch an online metro-regional coordination hub that aggregates and organizes information from the various coordination bodies, produces events that bring these bodies together, and develops a 10-year plan for improving metro-regional governance.

5) An Open Government Interface
Thanks to the city’s innovative open data law, city agencies are publishing a tremendous amount of information to the city’s open data portal, but finding the right information can get a little tricky. Professional researchers and large businesses have the resources needed to make sense of city data, but smaller businesses, journalists, and the vast majority of residents often do not.

Fortunately, the city created the Commission on Public Information and Communication (COPIC) with a charter mandate to “educate the public about the availability and potential usefulness of city produced or maintained information and assist the public in obtaining access to such information.” Unfortunately, information on COPIC is hard to find. It seems to lack an official website or an active Twitter. Go figure!

As Public Advocate, I will reconvene COPIC and work with that body to create a unified interface for information about city agencies, such as their budgets, expenses, capital projects, social services, performance indicators, and more. In the words of the original OpenCongress.org web project, we’ll build “the website [the city] should have made for itself.”

Successful implementation of the five solutions described above requires a focused vision, a motivated team with the right skills, and the resources — financial and political — that come with the Public Advocate’s office. As a technologist that helps nonprofits, governments, and startups build information systems to achieve specific goals, I know how to get this work done. As a concerned New Yorker dedicated to giving this city the government it deserves, I’m confident I will — whether I’m elected Public Advocate or not.

***
Devin Balkind is a nonprofit executive, civic technologist, and startup advisor running for Public Advocate as the Libertarian Party nominee. On Twitter @DevinBalkind.

(photo; Edwin J. Torres/Mayor’s Office)

reprinted from https://votedevin.com/2019/09/25/5-solutions-the-public-advocate-should-deliver-for-new-york-city/ by permission from author, September 25, 2019

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